Blog Archives

The Power of Imagination

Dear Readers,

I often forget how truly powerful and vast our imaginations can be, and nothing reminds me more than the reading of a book. I’ve lost count of the numbers of times that I have felt such a deep connection to characters in a novel that I experience a sort of deep sadness when the book is complete. And I’m sure I’m not the only one that has felt disappointment, and even anger, when a film adaptation of a book is horrendous or a character is depicted in a way that did not necessarily match up with who I pictured in my mind. And when this happens, I often think back to something my 12th grade English teacher told me: “I stay far away from film adaptations because I don’t want the image of the book and its characters to be ruined. They’re mine.”

And she was right: our imagination, this powerful thing, belongs to us. It is amazing that we can take words and create them into meanings and imagery that apply to us and reflect certain aspects about ourselves. It’s amazing how we can take the words of someone else and make them part of ourselves. And it is even more amazing that one author’s imagination can ignite inspiration in someone else. The same goes for any artist.

This is why I love reading and writing, and why I wish so much more emphasis was placed on these subjects as opposed to science and math. It is often said that children should be encouraged to dream and use their imagination. This is true, but why should they stop as they get older? I don’t think many realize that imagination is what writing is all about. For example, a teacher or professor may give an essay or presentation assignment on a book, and receive an immense variety of topics and themes that stood out to each student individually. I found it so interesting to listen and read about aspects of a novel or play that I never thought about or perhaps see a view on a character I never considered. It was like getting a sneak peek into the minds of my peers, understanding them a bit more.

Growing up, my favorite books for my brother and I were After Hamelin, Marco Millions, and of course, Harry Potter. We often talked and joked about why we liked them so much, and we eventually agreed that they took us to a different world. Our bodies may have been snuggled in our beds, but our minds and imaginations were taken on an amazing journey that we wished would never end. Have you ever looked up from a book you were reading and forgot that you were in the real world? Yeah, it was like that, and I hope that Kingdom of the Sun can give you the same feeling.

Peace and Love,

Ariffa

My Words

My book, Kingdom of the Sun. Publishing Soon!

Dear Readers,

On many occasions I have discussed the power and influence of language and the significance of the ability to see and feel one another.  Today I would like to talk about language as it relates to my words and why I write.

With words I can create riddles that may seem simple on the surface, but mean so much more underneath.  Words like: “Education needs to be Education” and “Live Life for a Life for Life.”

I can create anything I want, in any way I want, and call it my own.

With my words, I can formulate ideas, concepts, and imagery that once read on paper, become a part of you as they enter your mind and hopefully, your heart.

I can make you see things that perhaps you have never seen.

I can make you understand something that used to perplex you.

I can make you hear me without hearing me.

I can make you feel me without touching me.

And maybe, just maybe, I can make you believe in things you had no faith in, or perhaps…remove your faith in things you once believed.

My words are power and strength.  They are joy and sadness.  They are memories and dreams.  They are filled with hope and a message.

All for you.

Peace and Love,

Ariffa

Life for a Life for Life

imagesDear Readers,

Many, if not, practically all of us, have thought about what our goals are and should be in life.  There are even some of you who are still struggling with your sense of purpose and goals in this world.  When I was much younger, I thought about this briefly until I realized the simple answer: I wanted to live my life for other people.  I wanted to impact others and the world in a positive way and make a change for the better.  If one were to actually think about it, many of the most valued and difficult careers involve outreach, assistance, and aid to others (teachers, missionaries, doctors, nurses, firefighters, police officers, etc).

This lifestyle of living and working for others is very significant when it comes to leadership.  Our leaders should be there for their people and do everything in benefit for them.  However, I believe that I am not the only that feels this is sometimes not the case.  Should a leader be for themselves or for their people?  What does it truly mean to be a leader?  These are questions that I indirectly presented to my readers when I wrote Kingdom of the Sun because they pertain so much to our own lives.  And so, I wanted my book to be a reflection, and perhaps even a guide, as to what is going on in our world.

I have come realize that each “dead-end” job that I had had reaffirmed my passion because I know that my fire would not be as strong and that Kingdom of the Sun would not have been written if God didn’t put those difficulties and experiences in my life.  I may not fully be there yet, but each post I write and each word and theme that I embedded in my book was to inspire you, and touch you, and perhaps even fuel a fire in you as well.  You see, I write for you.

“Life for a Life”: Living for someone, a purpose.  “For Life”: A way of being and existing, because when I am bettering someone else’s life, it is then that I am alive and truly living.

Peace and Love,

Ariffa

Kingdom of the Sun Theme: Change…Will You Make it, Take it, or Question It?

“Kingdom of the Sun reflects the desire that most of us have to make a change, whether it be in the world or in our own lives, and how we may lack the strength or the courage to do it.”- Ariffa Bevin

ImageDear Readers,

The theme of change is ever-present in my upcoming novella Kingdom of the Sun.  With the desire, thought, and action of change comes many questions such as: “Have the promised changes occurred?,” “How long will it be until change happens?,” “How long will the change last?,” “What are the effects of change?,” and “Is this change really change,?”

Things change, and most of the time, it is inevitable.  I accept that.  But what I do not approve of is when change is accepted easily, without question of how or why or who said “change” really benefits.

“There are so many people that want change, but they do nothing about it. Then there are also those that want change but do not believe it will happen.”- Helena, Kingdom of the Sun  

Are you one of those people?

Like the character of Helena, there may be many things that are holding us back from making a change.  We must remember that when it comes to change, there two types of people: 1) Those who submit to the changes around them and are subject to whatever happens and 2) Those who will not only fight for change, but question and challenge it when it comes their way, never allowing themselves to be drones or puppets.

So many factors fall into making change and taking change, but two questions will always stand true:

1) How bad do you want it?

2) Will it/does it make a difference for the better?

Peace and Love,

Ariffa

Kingdom of the Sun Theme: Education…It Starts at Home

“Like other educators, our Scholars teach and give themselves to their work and their students, and they are highly respected for it. But unlike other educators, they are not expected to be babysitters or social workers, and every citizen of Sooryan recognizes that without the Scholars, they are nothing. One who is willing to give their time, energy, and minds to educating others is one of true honor.”- Helena, Kingdom of the Sun

UnknownDear Readers,

One of the main themes in Kingdom of the Sun (soon to be published) is education.  So many people do not realize that education starts at home.  Nor do they realize the pressure and stress that are placed on a teacher because they do not know this.  Imagine their workload: teaching the coursework, grading the coursework, making sure that their students pass, the stress of other teachers, the stress of their personal lives, and the stress of the expectations that they are to babysitters and/or social workers.

Now, because many people do not realize, understand, or accept that education starts at home, blame is placed on teachers pertaining to things that are really the parents’ fault.  So, let’s dig deeper.  Education starts at home in two ways:

1) Social Education: This pertains to parents teaching their kids manners, respect, self-presentation, respect, respect, and respect.

2) Academic Education: This relates to the fact that parents should teach their kids how to study, when to study, and how long to study.  It also involves monitoring and controlling how the student spends their time at home (video games, television, friends, etc.).

If parents took these two factors into account, then I guarantee that we will see greater improvements in behavior and test scores.  However, doing this may bring us back to the initial issue: Some parents do not believe that they have any responsibility over the education and development of a student.  That’s a bit ironic to me.

The education of a student is a three-way partnership between the teacher and student, the teacher and parent, and the parent and student.  Everyone has to believe this in order for the partnership to work and be successful.

Peace and Love,

Ariffa

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